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FastFreddy2

Favourite tipple?

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Firstly, let me confirm I'm not a 'drinker' in any sense of the word ... ;) Nor fortunately is anyone in my immediate family.

When I was young, going to the pub was fairly normal, it still being an inexpensive place to go, The term 'Off License' had a meaning, and alcohol wasn't available 24/7.

On a night out, I might start with a light and bitter, and because I was so small in stature, I then might have a whisky or two. A long night would involve 3 drinks, and an early morning do might end with a soft one. There were one or two occasions when more was consumed. but it took days to recover, and one such event means the smell of whisky still makes me 'gag'. That was a particularly bad one....

From my mid-twenties onward, the drink I've enjoyed the most, has been Dubonnet. While I can drink it 'neat', I tend to have with it with lemonade and ice, or suffer the room spinning after a couple of sips. (I know, "lightweight". ;) :D) While I can take or leave any other alcoholic drink, a Dubonnet is always regarded as a treat.

Recently I discovered my drink of choice is also enjoyed by none other than HRH Elizabeth R. B) Seems her preference it to take it with some gin. Since I prefer that over whisky (gag) bacardi (gag - same reason), or vodka (tasteless), I thought I might try it too. I don't like 'dry' anything, I read up on gin and decided I would try some Old Toms which is supposed to be sweeter than the more popular London Dry. Thwarted by the lack of this option at my local retailers, I opted for some Sloe Gin. I had tried some home made Sloe gin many years ago, and really liked it. Having arrived home with bottle, it wasn't long before I tried it. Yummy! Bit like a sweet liqueur really. When mixed with Dubonnet and ice, It was so pleasant I nearly downed it in minutes. A little over an hour later, my glass was empty and so was my head. :D 

 

 

 

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Gin doesn't cut it for me. I used to be fond of the big, bold Islay single malts - and still am to a degree - but After spending some time out there I have discovered the joys of fine rum from the Caribbean.  Eldorado, from Guyana, is a favourite.

like you, though, I am not a drinker. I bottle of rum will last me a year. But I do enjoy it!

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The closest I can get to rum (since being ill on whisky and Bacardi) is Malibu, which I take with pineapple. I remember being at a soirée in a neighbours home. I drank a little too much, which is easy for me with Malibu. I popped home, talked to the big (avocado) telephone and went back to the gathering, only to drink more Malibu. That would have been circa 1988. My sweet tooth has a lot to answer for.

Which is why I favour the sloe gin, over any other at this point, it's pleasantly sweet, and more of a liqueur. At least the brand I have seems to be. I've yet to taste the Old Tom variety. At the rate I drink spirits, it may be some time before I feel the need to buy ...

We've an open bottle of chocolate liqueur here being used as a door stop. (We both like chocolate). Neither of us can remember how long it's been open ... 2 years possibly? We promised ourselves a little dribble in late night coffees. Never happened.

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I too am a light drinker.   Apart from disliking inebriation and having a reduced tolerance to alcohol (probably following hepatitis some 40 years ago), I simply don't like the taste of many drinks, especially spirits such as whisky!   I do like semi-sweet vermouth (ideally Cinzano Bianco with lemonade, but Dubonnet is OK too) but cannot stomach Campari - although it is good for cleaning paint brushes, or drains!   I occasionally drink white-rum-and-cola and some fruity liqueurs.   But my daily tipple, if I have one at all, is likely to be a cider (particularly pear), a stout or porter (especially the newish Guinness Dublin Porter), or a lager (with curry or oriental food).   I will drink wine with a meal but not much as a purely social drink.

I have never liked gin and tonic (far too bitter) but am tempted to try the sloe gin you mention.

My intolerance of alcohol does not encourage social drinking as I can rarely keep up with others and, to be frank, I have better things to do with my pocket money than buy them (or even me) excess booze.   I don't really like pubs for this reason; drinking at home is more comfortable and certainly cheaper.   Some years ago, on a canal holiday with a group of friends (including children), it was quite common for us to stop at a canalside pub - rather too frequently in fact.   On one occasion, the pub garden (the usual venue, because of the kids) was too crowded with noisy yokels so, drinks bought inside, we all repaired to the boat and sat on it to consume them.   What a waste of money (especially for the kids' soft drinks) - we had our own booze on board and got absolutely nothing extra by paying pub prices (except for the bad language emanating from its garden patrons).   

 

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I've just remembered, as the nights are about to draw in, another occasional drink that is welcoming on a cold evening, perhaps after returning from an outside foray (e.g. frightening bystanders by being seen abroad in heels).   I refer to drinking chocolate (ideally made with a little evaporated milk) to which a slug of some peppermint-type liqueur has been added.   (Crème de menthe is ideal, but anything cheapo and minty will do.)   If you like After Seven MInts (I can't wait until 20.00), you will know and appreciate the resultant taste.

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If you like a hot chocolate drink, as I do, I highly recommend trying the hot chocolate from "Paul's". A French outfit by all accounts, with patisserie expensive enough to be an extra special treat .... But their hot chocolate .... Like drinking liquid chocolate. You may have to add your own peppermint though. ;)

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The Sloe Gin from Gordon's is proving a big hit with my palette. ;)

I've probably drunk more spirit in the last four weeks, than the previous 20 years, and I make no exaggeration when I say that. I still can't manage more than one, and that has to be with food too. :rolleyes:  

I may have to write to Elizabeth R, to recommend it; "My liege,"   

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11 hours ago, FastFreddy2 said:

The Sloe Gin from Gordon's is proving a big hit with my palette. ;) ...

Really, Freddy?   I suggested above that Campari was only fit for cleaning paintbrushes; you appear to be using the gin for similar artist-related purposes.   But maybe you find it appeals to your palate as a beverage.   :unsure:

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8 hours ago, FastFreddy2 said:

You two should start a double act .... ;) :P :D

Quite possibly.   My immediate thought was along the lines of 'Russell & Bromley', or 'Stead & Simpson' as we are two kindred 'soles'.   And, if Freddy was to join us, then 'Freeman, Hardy & Willis' would suit.   (Do you remember that outfit and the others from Charles Clore's erstwhile empire?)

4 hours ago, Shyheels said:

Alphonse and Gaston

But, having looked up this duo (of whom I had never previously heard),  I can see how apt they are - if that's all right with you, my dear fellow.

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27 minutes ago, Shyheels said:

Two monsters! :-)

 

No..... One monster, with two heads possibly .... A benign Orthrus like creature, as it were .... ;)

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I was addressing Shyheels in my last above - and he is undoubtedly a very singular fellow.

(Reminds me of one of many anecdotes about the late Sir Thomas Beecham.   On spying a newcomer to his orchestra in rehearsal, he asked the bloke's name.   'Ball, sir' was the reply - to which Sir Thomas responded 'How very singular'.

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1 hour ago, Puffer said:

I was addressing Shyheels in my last above - and he is undoubtedly a very singular fellow.

 

 

Of course, and was completely understood sir, hence my riposte;

 

On 08/11/2015, 00:28:12, FastFreddy2 said:

You two should start a double act .... ;) :P :D

 

Further, I not only remember the FHW brand but bought my very first pair of heels from them, with a little help from an obliging girlfriend I hope I successfully misinformed who would be the subsequent wearer. Oddly, I remember the shoes, the subterfuge, but not wearing them or keeping/disposing of them. I do remember seeing a tall girl walking along the path across the  road from our home, wearing an identical pair, and the immediate effect it had on my physical state.... It was a very long time ago, more than 40 years. I am not surprised I only recall the embarrassing bits.  :D

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11 hours ago, FastFreddy2 said:

... It was a very long time ago, more than 40 years. I am not surprised I only recall the embarrassing bits.  :D

You and me both.   But, aside from any embarrassment, don't we all have a handful (at least) of very vivid and distinct long-term memories of seeing a woman (or maybe a man) wearing some particularly attractive shoes?   I certainly recall several sightings from the 1960s that not only turned my head but were burnt into my memory - and still emerge regularly as a yardstick (or perhaps Holy Grail) when considering the ideal feminine look.   One day (soon), when I start to go gaga, I will hang onto those memories even more tightly.

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I fear I (just) missed the pinnacle of the high heel wearing era... I've memories of my mothers flip-floppy type dress mules with medium height wedge heels - that I tried and wore as often as possible when my feet grew.... I remember while at school, noticing how few girls wore a heel - which is maybe why I remember that girl walking along our road .... But for the likes of Elton John and his theatrical high heels, and those of other musical performers (Sweet springs to mind), for me the late 60's early 70's were a particularly flat period. Not until the mid to late 70's did heels really become a significant force in my life, going from a secret pleasure, to something completely indulged by wilful girlfriends.   

 

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I remember a very pretty red haired girl in my class (circa 1970) who often wore white go-go boots to school. I liked her (from afar) and I liked the dash she cut with thise boots. I wanted a pair too, not really comprehending at first, in those age if Aquarius days of softer gender lines in fashion that what I wanted were girl's boots and therefore 'forbidden'. I was really quite embarrassed when the penny finally dropped and I shoved such things out of my mind and began distrusting my tastes and sense of style and sought the saftey that is found in always following the herd. Not a good thing.

I had no interest whatever in women's shoes and still don't have any interest at all. I liked boots, but without ever being obsessed. When autumn would roll around though I would feel wistful that tall fashion boots were not permissible for guys and wished that I could have and wear a pair.

Because of the strong association with tall boots and women, I linked them with heels. The funny thing is, though, now that I have given myself permission to have and wear a pair of nice otk boots, I realise that the heels had little to do with it. I find flat otk boots equally, perhaps even more, appealing.

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Coincidently, there was a girl in my class would wear these. She was very slim, which was not that unusual in pre-fast food outlet times. (Back then 'fast food' was the chippie or the Chinese take-away.)

She was a bit self-concious about this, and almost always wore white woven-cotton tights. Not fish-nets, but a 'girlie' cousin to them. She always wore light colour on her legs, in the belief it made them appear 'thicker' in the way black is supposed to be thinning? I remember her name still, as she was the class Alpha female, who oddly, married and stayed married to the class Alpha male. 

 

As I've mentioned before, I've little or no experience of anything close to OTK boots other than a short/pleasurable experience with a pair that lasted around 4 weeks. I really liked them, and wore them most of my waking hours for that 4 weeks. With my legs, I feel that might never change... 

My 'walking friend' has a couple of pairs of boots, that most would consider OTK boots. Neither has a heel. One pair were typical of the swash-buckling type, with a larger thigh (or maybe even an open thigh) to aid knee movement. The other pair, go just over the knee and are a skin-fit. They were made by Faith, and those boots got a lot of interest from me, 20 years ago. ;) I might even have a photo somewhere ... She still has them, but her feet are in such poor shape (literally) she can no longer get them on without considerable discomfort. :(

I can understand the appeal of something like a long boot. The closest I may have come to experiencing the feel of something 'hugging' my legs (which I enjoy) is wearing support stockings, which doesn't sound very attractive at all. :D Shiny spandex sounds like a lot more fun, and I am minded to buy some. I have a medical condition (inherited from my mother) called 'restless leg' syndrome. It means my legs don't like resting while I'm in bed. At the moment I manage by having one or both feet hanging out from underneath the bedding, being 'cooled'. I have REALLY hot feet and this makes my restless legs worse. I have wondered if wearing something tight on my legs at night, would make things better? Probably not, though they would be less inclined to feel itchy. (The 'restless' bit.) Ho-humm. ;)

Have you provided any pictures of your OTK boots yet? :huh:

 

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I've no idea what ever happened to the pretty red haired girl who wore the go-go boots. A grandmother by now, no doubt. 

As for me I just like the elegance of long boots, especially suede. And, having worn them now, the comfort and warmth, especially on chilly autumn and winter days when I am at the computer. 

Ah yes, pics. As a photographer I am far more at home behind the camera than in front of it...

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