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marcelheels

Have you ever been to a Stiletto run?

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In 2006, The Netherlands, 'we' started with stiletto runs. They were quite popular for a few years. Are they in Great Britain as well??

Has anyone been to one?

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Not seen one, or heard of one locally (meaning in the UK).

I think they might have become less 'popular' generally, (less interesting) when men started to compete, and win. I have here some high-top plimsoll/trainers with a 4" heel. I would take on anyone while wearing those and potentially win because they are like wearing trainers. I don't know whether they would be outlawed in these runs, but wearing them would provide no handicap to my running speed at all. 

Six inch heels with a 1" or 2" platform, might as well tie my ankles together for all the speed I'd manage. I could barely walk in them, much less run. :wacko:

 

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There has been at least one charity walk for heel-wearers (which I recall a member here took part in) but I don't remember where or when.

As with most charity fundraisers, the physical effort, wasted time and potential for injury and damage would likely outweigh the achievement (If any) and potential for enjoyment.   Last time I was asked to sponsor someone (for a half-marathon), I offered to double the money if the would-be participant stayed at home instead and did something useful.   (Oh yes, I'm a bundle of fun - especially at Christmas.) 

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8 hours ago, Puffer said:

There has been at least one charity walk for heel-wearers (which I recall a member here took part in) but I don't remember where or when.

As with most charity fundraisers, the physical effort, wasted time and potential for injury and damage would likely outweigh the achievement (If any) and potential for enjoyment.   Last time I was asked to sponsor someone (for a half-marathon), I offered to double the money if the would-be participant stayed at home instead and did something useful.   (Oh yes, I'm a bundle of fun - especially at Christmas.) 

Here in Holland it's not for charity; just for money, haha! 

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8 hours ago, FastFreddy2 said:

Not seen one, or heard of one locally (meaning in the UK).

I think they might have become less 'popular' generally, (less interesting) when men started to compete, and win. I have here some high-top plimsoll/trainers with a 4" heel. I would take on anyone while wearing those and potentially win because they are like wearing trainers. I don't know whether they would be outlawed in these runs, but wearing them would provide no handicap to my running speed at all. 

Six inch heels with a 1" or 2" platform, might as well tie my ankles together for all the speed I'd manage. I could barely walk in them, much less run. :wacko:

 

We seem to be quite professional is this, haha.

The runs are just a few 100 meters, and men are not allowed.

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9 hours ago, euchrid said:

nope.  UK has never done one as far as I can recall.

Pitty! It's fun watching those. I was there when the first race was held!

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3 hours ago, marcelheels said:

The runs are just a few 100 meters, and men are not allowed.

A truly sexist race then? :D

I vaguely remember this all coming about, the high heel races, walks for charity - in heels, and what could have been more.

What I can't quite remember was the name of the "banner" principle that the charity races were done under. I'm thinking "Pink" something, but that doesn't ring true. What I do (vaguely) remember, was the American version of these charitable enterprises, supported (in principle) those with or who had suffered, breast cancer. The same "banner" title in the UK, was and maybe still is, associated with women who had been abused by men. While this is still a very laudable cause, it's not one many people are happy to be aware of. Put another way, it's a bit of a 'hard sell' as charitable causes go (it seems to me). I wouldn't be surprised to find it's the reason why high-heeled races in the UK almost certainly never happened. I know sponsored walks did, but I don't recall (if they were mentioned) the charity/charities involved. 

But women only high heeled races, for prizes? In another era, that's the sort of thing Paul Raymond or Hugh Hefner would have dreamt up. 

 

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Found it .... "Walk a mile in her shoes".

"Pink"? :rolleyes:

This video is over 4 years old, and still has less than 4,000 views. "Hard sell" is right. ("A dark subject.")

 

The lady shown in the still from the video looks to be wearing some attractive heels, but that's as good as it gets as far as the video goes.

Not sure why I thought there was a difference between American and Brit versions of the "Walk" theme. Perhaps the heels thing was also being used for breast cancer or something like it. We are talking 6 or more years ago..... But as I've said several times now, while awareness and help all supportable (worthy cause) as one of the participants says, it's a "dark subject", and one many would rather keep that way - rightly or wrongly. 

Edited by FastFreddy2

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2 hours ago, FastFreddy2 said:

A truly sexist race then? :D

I vaguely remember this all coming about, the high heel races, walks for charity - in heels, and what could have been more.

What I can't quite remember was the name of the "banner" principle that the charity races were done under. I'm thinking "Pink" something, but that doesn't ring true. What I do (vaguely) remember, was the American version of these charitable enterprises, supported (in principle) those with or who had suffered, breast cancer. The same "banner" title in the UK, was and maybe still is, associated with women who had been abused by men. While this is still a very laudable cause, it's not one many people are happy to be aware of. Put another way, it's a bit of a 'hard sell' as charitable causes go (it seems to me). I wouldn't be surprised to find it's the reason why high-heeled races in the UK almost certainly never happened. I know sponsored walks did, but I don't recall (if they were mentioned) the charity/charities involved. 

But women only high heeled races, for prizes? In another era, that's the sort of thing Paul Raymond or Hugh Hefner would have dreamt up. 

 

You might be right about the ribbon part: 'pink ribbon'.

Could have been involved here too, but I'm not sure. Definately not during the first ever race here, which was organised by a womans magazine.

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2 hours ago, FastFreddy2 said:

Found it .... "Walk a mile in her shoes".

"Pink"? :rolleyes:

This video is over 4 years old, and still has less than 4,000 views. "Hard sell" is right. ("A dark subject.")

 

The lady shown in the still from the video looks to be wearing some attractive heels, but that's as good as it gets as far as the video goes.

Not sure why I thought there was a difference between American and Brit versions of the "Walk" theme. Perhaps the heels thing was also being used for breast cancer or something like it. We are talking 6 or more years ago..... But as I've said several times now, while awareness and help all supportable (worthy cause) as one of the participants says, it's a "dark subject", and one many would rather keep that way - rightly or wrongly. 

There are a lot of pink ribbon events here too; mostly walk events (24 hour) and a lot of candles around the 'track'. People can buy paper bags, for around 5€. They write a wish for someone they lost through cancer, fill the bag with sand,  and put a light on top. So everyone can reed the messages. 

I have been to a few. Wuite emotional stuff.

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