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Shyheels

People watching

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Sitting here at Cafe Nero in Terminal four awaiting my flight - and a good long wait it will be as I misread (badly and in haste) my departure time. I can't even check in yet and get to the business lounge so here I sit people watching.

It is quite curious the various things people choose to wear - and do so with so little fanfare. For instance I spotted an elderly gentleman wearing a trenchcoat and a pith helmet - and I don't mean one of those make-believe faux pith helmets you see in costume shops occasionally but a genuine 19th century sola topee. Truly authentic. It caught my eye, made me smile and intrigued me too. Outside of movies like The Man Who Would Be King and museum displays, I had never actually seen anybody wearing a sola topee.

The old guy wore it with perfect aplomb and that made it work. I don't know how many people noticed but certainly nobody stared. He went on his way and blended into the crowd...

Edited by Shyheels

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I have already mentioned I hate flying, but love airports, and you have confirmed why. B)

It's not true of Camden Market any longer, but UK airports (as Camden used to be) places where; if you were going to see someone with two heads THAT'S where you will see it. The throughput of diverse people is staggering. I have experienced similar at Waterloo, Liverpool Street and King Cross rail stations, but airports produce the most glamorous opportunities.

As for people watching.... I would have a holiday for two reasons; Swimming in clear water. Spending the evening after dinner, sitting in a street café watching people walk past. In our hotel, other guest would get nicknames or titles. For entertainment, I would weave imaginary tales and lifestyles to each group we saw. ;)

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Street cafes are great. Airports can be a bit samey - the chap in the sola topee was a real exception. 

I too like to imagine stories and backgrounds behind the people I observe. Who needs movies?

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Yes, people watching can be fun.   I am not a latent crossdresser (at least in any serious lifestyle sense, as distinct from a spot of experimentation) but I very often see a woman in an outfit that makes me wish I could wear it in public and with same ease as she does.   And of course just female footwear can have the same effect.   This can easily lead me to imagine myself in the woman's skin and wonder about her lifestyle, clothes and shoe choices and whether she likes to wear (higher) heels, other styles ...

Easy but sometimes frustrating escapism.

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11 hours ago, Puffer said:

Yes, people watching can be fun.   I am not a latent crossdresser (at least in any serious lifestyle sense, as distinct from a spot of experimentation) but I very often see a woman in an outfit that makes me wish I could wear it in public and with same ease as she does.   And of course just female footwear can have the same effect.   This can easily lead me to imagine myself in the woman's skin and wonder about her lifestyle, clothes and shoe choices and whether she likes to wear (higher) heels, other styles ...

Easy but sometimes frustrating escapism.

 

I have made no secret of my past experience of going 'en femme' to allow the facilitation of me wearing heels in public during social activity. While it needed some (ahemm) foundation garments to prevent bulges in the wrong places and help with bulges in the right places, I have never taken it so far as to wear ladies 'smalls', so I always recognised I was a man in womens attire. That said, I did do the full-makeup bit**, and as my hair had just started to thin a tad I did use a wig too. (Sometimes.) I've always had long nails, and I mean long, so there was no need for additions. Not that there were nail bars then as there are now. I doubt I dressed up more than five times a year over a 3 year period. It never once occurred to me, I could go out wearing heels in men's clothing. Which in hindsight, seems completely .... odd? 

I mention this 'history' because .... I have my doubts clothing that might be identifiable as womenswear, might not look right on a completely masculine torso, unless some feminisation of the periphery was also added. This is not about sex/or indeed sexualisation of the person, it's about the overall look. We more readily assimilate what we are familiar with. Looks that we are unfamiliar with, are more likely to be noticed, and not always in a good way. Like, a man in heels for example. :rolleyes:

In terms of decision making for that look by a woman, I'm sure the process changes over time. Young decisions are quick and made with a possible outcome from an evening out, probably being a critical factor. Later on in life, a woman will likely decide on a comfort level first, and to make sure she blends, rather than is noticed. (ie. Skirt too short, skirt too tight. None of which ever seemed to be a concern to any girl I knew in my 20's.)  I'm sure their thought processes around these decisions are by need, much more complex than those employed by men, in general. Either looking at the process in work, or my limited experience of it, all suggest it's long and complicated.

For me, as an example, it meant going without food on the day of the event so I could be as slim as possible for the evening. My nails would be smooth as to avoid catching on the hose I would wear. Toe nails cut short for the same reason. Legs shaved or creamed naked. Eyebrows plucked ... The list isn't endless, but it was/is long. In keeping with that, even now Mrs Freddy doesn't want to wear anything close to tight fitting, if she's having a fat day or a fat week. She (wrongly in my opinion) chooses to wear bulky clothing to (she thinks) hide her tummy. In reality, it makes her look twice the size she actually is. :blink: If you could put yourself inside the mindset required to carry out these decisions, would you really want to? :huh:

 

 ** At the time, I was doing a lot of photography, mostly portraiture. While my live in (hairdresser) girlfriend would do the female models hair, foundation and often their eye makeup, I would always - always do the lipstick. I might do the facial contouring which is again popular, and sometimes do or adjust their eye makeup if the shot needed it. I got quite adept.

P.S.

At this time Boy George was on the front of most newspapers, and later on so was his friend "Marilyn". Both did magazine covers, and I think B.G. even did Vogue once. This sat on the back of the New Romantic movement, a time when dandyism was everywhere and dress styles merged more than at any time before or since. Heady days.

 

 

Edited by FastFreddy2

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I am not into, nor interested in, crossdressing in the least - not even curious about it. That whole thing just passes me by. I am not repelled by the idea, nor judgemental, just not interested - any more than I am interested in learning how to play bridge or repair a car engine. Just not my thing.

I do like tall suede boots which, for reasons that remain obscure to me, society has decided are feminine in nature although the style of otk boots that I like have no overtly feminine characteristics. Pull-on style, lowish block heels or just standard sorts of dress-shoe heels, dark grey or brown suede, just over the knees.

curiously enough my PVC jeans, ordered but not yet arrived, look almost identical to my wife's from her rock chic days in the early 1990s. Hers were men's PVCs. Mine, judging by the sizings, appear to be women's, but as I say they are virtually identical. So who woukd be crossdressing? Me thinks neither of us. 

 

 

 

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45 minutes ago, Shyheels said:

I do like tall suede boots which, for reasons that remain obscure to me, society has decided are feminine in nature although the style of otk boots that I like have no overtly feminine characteristics. Pull-on style, lowish block heels or just standard sorts of dress-shoe heels, dark grey or brown suede, just over the knees.

 

 

While shopping a supermarket yesterday I saw a fairly tall brown skinned girl who was, to be frank, drop dead gorgeous. I wouldn't be at all surprised if she works as a model, at least part time, her slim frame and obvious looks lending itself to that. While her bright red lipstick was the first thing to catch my eye .... Her boots should get a 'worthy mention'.

They were a yellow/orange sand colour, that went well with light coloured coat, and skin tone. A modest heel of about 40mm, and a shaft height that took them to the highest point possible without becoming OTK boots. Most importantly, they were both skin tight, and made of suedeB)

Because of the attention she was doubtless getting, trying to get a 'snap' of her footwear was impossible I'm afraid. :( And she wasn't there doing a weekly shop either, so I only caught two fleeting glimpses of her. To be honest, I'm seldom looking about the knee of anyone in these venues, but I'd misplaced Mrs Freddy and her hair colour is currently a good way to find her. The red lipstick'd girl had walked around a corner as I was looking down an aisle almost directly into my gaze (though hers was elsewhere). As she walked past, of course I looked downward and noticed her 'statement' boots. 

I've had a look on Google for something similar, and not found anything there either. :rolleyes:

 

With regard to the cross-dressing .... I have always been - so probably always will be, into tight fitting clothing. Not so much for the benefit of wearing materials normally associated with a fetishist lifestyle, like rubber or leather, but more from the constriction point/experience really. While me dressing 'en femme' actually was a means to an end, it wasn't an unattractive thing for me to do, though it did feel like quite hard work sometimes.... The benefits from it were there at the places we used to frequent though. If we went as a boy/girl couple, both young-ish/fit/slim/not unattractive, no-one would approach. If we went as a girl/girl size 8 couple both wearing 5 inch heels, we almost always got approaches, sometimes with unexpected results. Vanity suggests I post a 'selfie' but paranoia even more strongly suggests I don't. ;) :D

Touch can be quite an erotic sensation, although us men tend to rely on sight. I have found, having my legs and torso touched or held by compressive clothing, to be very sensual. If you have never experienced a recently de-haired leg covered in something like hose, and the sensation of the material caressing your leg as you move, I would suggest you have missed out on sampling one of the benefits of being a woman. Perhaps they can and do take it for granted, but it really is a pleasure. To make the most of the opportunity I try to keep my legs hair free. I fail miserably, even though I easily justify it for cycling purposes. (You don't want to be repairing gravel rash amongst a matt of hair, or removing a plaster stuck firmly to a hairy leg.) 

On a foot note to this cross-dressing verses transvestite theme.... For me trans is all about becoming womanly, where cross-dressing is more about androgenising a dress style. (This is where a dress code uses no sex identifiable clothing [ie jeans] or uses clothing associated with both.) When I wear hold ups for example, they are always hidden. I wear them to keep warm, not to sexulise myself, or transsexualise myself or my appearance. In keeping with my own assessment of how a woman's attitude to clothing changes over years (from looks to comfort) mine too is to do with comfort. I struggle with cold legs in wind. [Last Sunday I was out in jeans with leggings, and got chilled legs in the wind. If I was better prepared, I would have worn hold-ups too, under my leggings and jeans.] 

And as a footnote to my footnote ..... I was given a ladies T shirt to use use for work, which does no favours to my clothing. It's a bit snug but otherwise fits well, so I have removed the identifying label and kept it for non-work use. First time I wore it, Mrs Freddy remarked it looked like I had been to the gym, and was that T shirt new? ;)  She has no idea (and I'm not telling) that she has complimented me for wearing a 'ladies' T shirt. B)

 

 

 

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I can certainly understand the cold weather bit. Many years ago, on a long and remote cycling expedition, I got a nasty case of hypothermia because I did not bother with a wickable base layer. I do now. Fairly sheer merino is my go-to material, both in tights and top. 

I don't recall if my base layers came in men's or women's styles - probably they did, based in colour, with men's being drab and women's more cheerful. Although I prefer the more cheerful colours in the women's line-up, being six foot and 13 stone (plus on occasion) considerably reduces my choices! Bright colours tend not to come in my size.

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On 12/13/2015 at 1:42 PM, Puffer said:

...   I am not a latent crossdresser (at least in any serious lifestyle sense, as distinct from a spot of experimentation) but I very often see a woman in an outfit that makes me wish I could wear it in public and with same ease as she does.   ...

For the avoidance of doubt (as the lawyers say), perhaps I should clarify that somewhat vague statement.   I have tried on the odd female garment (aside from footwear) but have never attempted to dress completely and/or make up as a woman, let alone go outside en femme.   Nor am I likely too; even if I wanted to (and I freely admit to considering that it could be 'fun' on a purely experimental basis - who hasn't thought that?), my height is a drawback even if I have reasonably shapely legs and am not (yet) gross enough to pass only as an 'ugly sister'.  

And admiring a woman in a nice outfit and wanting to wear it is more likely to appeal to me if the components of the outfit are not overtly feminine - think silk shirt, jacket, trousers and high-heeled boots or loafers rather than lacy top, mini-skirt and stiletto sandals.   In other words, items that are broadly male or unisex in style but given that 'difference' to make them appeal (mostly) to women - a high heel added to a Chelsea boot or loafer being an obvious and simple example of something stolen from men and (damn them!) improved - but which men cannot then have for themselves.   At least, not without some physical or mental anguish.

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7 hours ago, Shyheels said:

II don't recall if my base layers came in men's or women's styles 

I'm pretty sure the 'ladies' tops come with at least one horizontal dart that starts at the armpit and goes forward a couple of inches ... ;)

I don't own a cycling one, but that dart would do a lot to help accommodate my "moobs". :P :D

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10 hours ago, Puffer said:

 

For the avoidance of doubt (as the lawyers say), perhaps I should clarify that somewhat vague statement.   I have tried on the odd female garment (aside from footwear) but have never attempted to dress completely and/or make up as a woman, let alone go outside en femme.   Nor am I likely too; even if I wanted to (and I freely admit to considering that it could be 'fun' on a purely experimental basis - who hasn't thought that?), my height is a drawback even if I have reasonably shapely legs and am not (yet) gross enough to pass only as an 'ugly sister'.  

Although not a mandatory ingredient to it, I have always thought curiosity to be a sign of intelligence in humans. I add the caveat because curiosity in cats is most definitely not a sign of intelligence - in my experience. ;)

 

10 hours ago, Puffer said:

And admiring a woman in a nice outfit and wanting to wear it is more likely to appeal to me if the components of the outfit are not overtly feminine - think silk shirt, jacket, trousers and high-heeled boots or loafers rather than lacy top, mini-skirt and stiletto sandals.   In other words, items that are broadly male or unisex in style but given that 'difference' to make them appeal (mostly) to women - a high heel added to a Chelsea boot or loafer being an obvious and simple example of something stolen from men and (damn them!) improved - but which men cannot then have for themselves.   At least, not without some physical or mental anguish.

Although I assume much in saying so, your comments read as to a similar line of thinking to myself, in that you have an interest in styles for yourself that are not overtly feminine but SHOULD pass as androgynous. The 'styles' are those that you would find attractive to wear, given a free hand (that none of us feel we have)?

My immediate thought after reading your post was, if only we were young enough to 'get away with being fashion frontiersmen' trying to breakdown the barriers of our rather conservative dress codes .... But then we live in fairly conservative times? Even if we were young enough to be seen as 'fashion victims', rather than 'old queens', would we dare?

As I've already said, my means to an end to wearing a heel (with the exception of two outings - I will mention later) was to go out en femme and to blend in to 'the scene' where dressing up wasn't unusual, and even desirable. It never once occurred to me, to do as I do now, and that's to wear a heel in public during normal activity. And it might have been at a time (and I repeat myself again) during the early 80's when it might not have raised as many eyebrows as it might today? I would think the late 60's early 70's was another good time, as men grew really long hair and started wearing tight tops and flared trousers.

I'm left wondering what it takes, to have the mindset of a fashion frontiersman? In my limited experience, having the basic physical qualities required** and the strength of mind to use it, don't often seem to be available in the same decade? :(

 

** Good overall shape ~ tall and slim. No paunch, good head of hair. Smooth skin. In summary, young! :D

 

 

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2 minutes ago, FastFreddy2 said:

... Although I assume much in saying so, your comments read as to a similar line of thinking to myself, in that you have an interest in styles for yourself that are not overtly feminine but SHOULD pass as androgynous. The 'styles' are those that you would find attractive to wear, given a free hand (that none of us feel we have)?

My immediate thought after reading your post was, if only we were young enough to 'get away with being fashion frontiersmen' trying to breakdown the barriers of our rather conservative dress codes .... But then we live in fairly conservative times? Even if we were young enough to be seen as 'fashion victims', rather than 'old queens', would we dare? ...

Yes, you are right; that is very much my view - and (if I think about it) one I have held since childhood.   But I claim no deep interest in or knowledge of 'fashion', have never attempted in practice to be 'trendy' (let alone a trendsetter) and was certainly too timid to be adventurous in my clothing.   My background and activity was far too conservative to consider anything daring or unconventional, especially as my height would never allow me to remain inconspicuous.

As I grew (much) older and (much) wiser, I realised that I could push the boundaries a little without embarrassment all round.   Five years or so ago I bought my first pair of (men's) cuban heels - and felt very daring and a bit silly wearing them outside; the sky didn't fall in ...   If I was young again: yes, I probably would be more daring (feeling as I now do) and certainly if it was the 1970s when men had a lot more latitude - not that I liked, then or now, most of what they wore - too gaudy and fussy all round; I am fundamentally a plain dresser and most of the looks I like on women fall into that category too.     

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When I was a kid, in the late 60s, early 70s, I was very much into the styles of the day - bright colours, patterns, paisley, Jesus shirts, bell bottoms. I was completely into the whole look. My mother (father was dead by then) was indulgent up to a point, but beyond that point used light mockery to (sadly) telling effect to reign in my enthusiasms and exhuberance. I was sensitive. I persisted for a while but then finally gave in and trotted along with the more conservative, much less hippyishherd.

 I regret it now. Had I made a stand nothing bad would have happened...

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13 minutes ago, Shyheels said:

 I regret it now. Had I made a stand nothing bad would have happened...

 

That isn't necessarily so.

I have always been a bit wayward. Some ventures into certain avenues have thankfully come to an abrupt end. I once had a little dalliance with cannabis, or something like it. (I am no expert in this field.) It didn't end well, and it caused me to swear off any pharmaceuticals unless made by a reputable (cough) manufacturer and bought in a retail packet. Your enhanced involvement with what sounds like the ground-breakers of the hippy movement could have ended up with you addicted to something nasty. My limited experience in this, suggests the route can be fast, and only slowed by the immediate absence of product.

I'm minded to the Peter Green story, he of the original Fleetwood Mac lineup. Generally understood to be one of the greatest musicians of the that time, if not of the century. Drug use back then, almost came with social pressure to experiment, amongst those who had ready access. While some would say Peter Green always had something of a fragile mind, on his first/only LSD 'trip' while in Germany, the experience sent him into a virtual oblivion for 30 years.     

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Actually no. I have never had even the slightest desire to tinker with such things - not even out of curiosity. I was well aware of the drug culture at the time and certainly when I was a private liberal arts university in the 70s where there was a BIG drug culture. Had no interest. Plenty of opportunities, and a girl friend at the time who was heavily into the drug and boho theatre scene, but no desire or interest at my end at all.  Nor did she ever try to influence me. She was probably the easiest-going, least judgemental person I ever met.  

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1 hour ago, Shyheels said:

Actually no. I have never had even the slightest desire to tinker with such things - not even out of curiosity.

Because you went along a different path .... ;)

That different path had you meeting a less accommodating group, who may have spiked your drink for the humour of it .... Or a different girlfriend that had HER interests at heart not yours, and might find you more compliant if slightly drugged....

It's all conjecture....

I know for sure, if I had taken that 'other route' (professional photographer) I would certainly be dead already, and dead for some time. I have friends who went to the London College of Fashion, and getting an 'in' (access) to rising stars would have been simple. I had already started doing work for wealthy people, and those in the hairdressing industry. It would have been a very natural move. And so would the excesses that came with it. For example, I mooted at "unexpected results" from going out as girl/girl with my then, girlfriend....

We were invited to, and attended, a very private fetish party in the West End. It was financed by a minor political figure (we were told) who might have been some MP or Minister's Private Secretary. The venue was a hotel suite, with a bathroom the size of my house. The bath was practically a swimming pool with rails around it, and steps to get in. Four poster in the bedroom, that got some action - after we left. We were invited to stay for the after party, party, but I have never been into group sex and I didn't want to encourage my girlfriend into it either.

Another time, again while in girl/girl mode, we were invited to and attended as guests, an 'after gig' private dinner given by the owner/publisher of a well-known fetish glamour magazine/business. Which I believe is still alive today. With access like that, it would not have been hard to edge my way into some photographic work for him. But again, that work brings excesses, that I would have succumbed to - I'm sure.

Mrs Freddy knows nothing of these adventures, but would still confirm with the little she does know about my past, I'm lucky to have survived it. My conventional upbringing may have made my life slightly less colourful than it might otherwise have been, but it also kept me away from the excesses that would have led me into a lifestyle few cope well with. And this assumes I would have done well with the 'other' career too. How much worse were my chances of survival if I had failed at being successful in the job? Perhaps earning a living shooting porn .... Seedy glamour? Meeting girls using coke to get through a session? No, on balance I'm glad I took the route I did. Safer, but got me a much longer stint here. ;) 

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My formative years were very dull and unremarkable, even compared to the modest (s)exploits reported above.   My family was solid, respectable, middle-class, suburban (dad a fairly senior civil servant with a very old-fashioned and cautious outlook).   Having left grammar school in 1966 - no university as I doubted my ability to progress along a similar academic road - I entered a respectable but unexciting profession.   My onward route was predictable: studies; exams; qualification (after 5 years); career advancement; house move; first marriage; children ...  you get the picture.   Alas, I was too young to participate much in the 'rock-and-roll' era (stiletto heels and beehives; winklepickers and leather jackets etc) which I admired from afar, and was not at all comfortable with the flower-power/hippy movement that followed (mini skirts and knee boots; flared trousers and platform shoes), or the long hair and make-up (both sexes) that then developed.   Apart from anything else, none of that would have sat well with my career (or my somewhat boring and largely solitary hobbies).  

I have always been something of a puritan: a very modest drinker, non-sportsman, non-thrill-seeker, who has kept well away from raucous parties or other excesses and the drink/drugs/casual sex that inevitably went with them.   Altogether a conventional, respectable, somewhat boring existence.   Frankly, I doubt that I would have chosen much of a different life if I had my time over again in the same era - except that I would almost certainly not have entered the same profession, which I did largely escape from in my mid-thirties, when my life did change somewhat, ultimately ending in separation/divorce/remarriage/new home.   Even now, I find it difficult to decide what my ideal and achievable lifestyle would have been (or would be now) as I am too serious/responsible an individual to simply drop-out, do my own thing and hope to find contentment.   Of course, because I am a member here shows that I do have other (largely unfulfilled) mildly enjoyable interests and desires - but nothing to suggest that I could or should lead a markedly different life in the modest span that probably remains.   Regrets?   I have a few ...

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When I say I followed the herd I am perhaps being ingenuous, or rather, referring to a particular facet or facets of life - in ths instance fashion. As I say I was never in the least interested in, or tempted by, the drug scene. In other ways I was far from followng the ordinary paths. I hitchhiked away from college and drifted around the US for a couple of years, living in the juice of a cracker, before heading overseas and never really returned. 

I've not had anything like a sensible career, and have little enough to show for it other than memories, but I have plenty of those.  I've managed to see over 100 countries on every continent, run grade six rapids on a raft, cycled through Africa, Australia, Asia and Europe, rounded the cape in a yacht, stood on the South Pole, run marathons in pretty quick time, and not worked in an office for over 25 years. 

 

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3 hours ago, Shyheels said:

When I say I followed the herd I am perhaps being ingenuous, or rather, referring to a particular facet or facets of life - in ths instance fashion. As I say I was never in the least interested in, or tempted by, the drug scene. In other ways I was far from followng the ordinary paths. I hitchhiked away from college and drifted around the US for a couple of years, living in the juice of a cracker, before heading overseas and never really returned. 

I've not had anything like a sensible career, and have little enough to show for it other than memories, but I have plenty of those.  I've managed to see over 100 countries on every continent, run grade six rapids on a raft, cycled through Africa, Australia, Asia and Europe, rounded the cape in a yacht, stood on the South Pole, run marathons in pretty quick time, and not worked in an office for over 25 years. 

 

Two questions, Shyheels: (i) where were you born and raised?   (ii) what does 'living in the juice of a cracker' mean?   (I'm guessing 'off your wits' or 'hand-to-mouth').

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I'm a New Englander - old family; descendent of many sea captains and, in the 19th century, footloose artists. Bohemia and wandering is in my blood.

Yup, not much juice in a cracker...

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5 hours ago, Shyheels said:

When I say I followed the herd I am perhaps being ingenuous, or rather, referring to a particular facet or facets of life - in ths instance fashion. As I say I was never in the least interested in, or tempted by, the drug scene. In other ways I was far from followng the ordinary paths. I hitchhiked away from college and drifted around the US for a couple of years, living in the juice of a cracker, before heading overseas and never really returned. 

I've not had anything like a sensible career, and have little enough to show for it other than memories, but I have plenty of those.  I've managed to see over 100 countries on every continent, run grade six rapids on a raft, cycled through Africa, Australia, Asia and Europe, rounded the cape in a yacht, stood on the South Pole, run marathons in pretty quick time, and not worked in an office for over 25 years. 

 

 

In short, an adventurer, which is wholly in keeping with your family tradition. (Argue if you will. :P)

 

Unlike you (or Puffer) I was brought up much closer to the coal-face. As I get older, I realise our family shares horror stories really, not fond memories of growing up. We didn't live off the juice of a cracker while we travelled, we lived off the juice of a cracker every day I can remember. Mrs Freddy's family pretty much had it the same way. Her dad would be fed, and her mother, herself and her two sisters, would share a meal between them, not much bigger. When I first met Mrs Freddy's younger sister she wasn't much bigger than a bag of bones, and I was only a couple of pounds heavier. When I have mentioned here about my waist size of 26/27 inches in my late 20's, you might now understand why. I was never over-fed.

Unlike some others, my life had what I will describe as 'bad influences' in it. I'm sure others here will have mixed with these types at some stage, but may not have been subjected to their influence for long, or possibly at all. Drugs are not the only life-changing 'alternative' path. Perhaps I laboured that particular point too much? Thing is, none of us know what life might have brought us if we trod differently.

I've gotten to where I am (alive) and largely happy with my life, without the guidance I could have used while growing up. The core of my life has been accumulating a modest property through wit, rather than hard work. And providing myself with a small nest-egg that will help me survive should every opportunity of providing myself with an income, dry up. What is the phrase my mothers uses when talking about me? Is it "dances to his own tune" perhaps?

To repeat myself; had I chosen an alternate route, I almost certainly would be long dead by now.  

 

 

 

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I won't make fun of your past hardships, Freddy, am am pleased that you (and Mrs F) have survived and flourished.   But I did wonder whether we were going on to hear about one of you eating a bowl of warm gravel for breakfast and getting up at 3am to walk 50 miles to work ... :o

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12 minutes ago, Puffer said:

I won't make fun of your past hardships, Freddy, am am pleased that you (and Mrs F) have survived and flourished.   But I did wonder whether we were going on to hear about one of you eating a bowl of warm gravel for breakfast and getting up at 3am to walk 50 miles to work ... :o

 

Did your 'ghost writer' pen the first half sentence, and forget to brief on it's meaning? :D

In kind. ;) "The bourgeoisie lauding it over the proletariat as history demands. How right was Marx?" :D   

 

We were too weak with hunger to walk 50 miles .... ;)

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warm gravel for breakfast? You were lucky...

Edited by Shyheels
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