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hh4evr1

Charity Shop Experience

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I have brought shoes in charity shops. All are practically new, but really cheap.

Yesterday I was looking at dvd's and went to leave and saw a pair of shoes. I already had a pair but my sister had seen my pair and wanted a pair the same. I brought them for her. The assistant asked me if they needed trying on. I declined the offer and said they were for my sister. Afterwards I wished I had said yes (my sister and me are the same size).

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The assistant asked me if they needed trying on.

That's the interesting bit, right there.

These people [shop staff] see shoes sold all the time, we don't. I would suggest his/her offer eluded to knowing these might be for you, hence the query about trying on?

No shame in turning down the offer, you never know who might walk in the door - a real concern if you are shopping locally. Nice the shop staff offered/expected you to try them before buying? [if I understand this right?]

......

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I have brought shoes from there before and have not been asked if I wanted to try them on. They were the same people working (old ladies).

Next time I will take them up on the offer to try them on.

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In my opinion, you should have tried them on, but don't beat yourself up because you didn't.

You already enjoy the act of simply wearing heels so why not add to it. Men usually don't wear

heels or woman's shoes, so I imagine that there is a little bit of a thrill trying them on in the

store, daring, being outside the box, living on the edge. If nothing else, the elderly ladies

surely would have enjoyed watching you.

E

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I got a great pair of thrift store boots a few weeks back! Only four inch boots, but so easy to walk in...Going down one inch in heel size has allowed me to walk in my boots with confidence publicly. Although I do admit that most of the heels are hidden under my levis, being out publicly in my boots is so liberating for me. I strolled into a str8 bar with no problems, even ran into a few of my crewmembers in the hotel lobby, they didn't notice either! They just assumed I was wearing my usual cowboy boots!

Admittedly, I didn't try the boots on in the store...Took the $10 risk and am sooooo happy I did!

Don

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Had a great day in Seattle! Even though I was not able to meet up with a local bootbud for pictures...

Wore my 4" boots, out and about, probably walked about 3 miles total, up and down hills and stairs...I even wore my boots to the local Eagle bar, nobody noticed probably because it is dark in there. Really felt great, my confidence is slowly increasing, inhibitions slowly fading...

Wanted to try my 5" crotch boots this morning for a short walk, in the hopes all my 4" experience translated into increased 5" abilities...Oh well, managed a stroll around the block in my 5"ers, but am still not proficient enough to pull it off confidently...These boot heels are not the strong, so could feel them flexing around a bit. Was also self concious because of my self imposed "small foot complex", thinking others were noticing. I need to look for 5" boots with a slight platform that will cushion my feet slightly. I also need to find pointed toe 5" boots so my feet won't appear to be so small when covered in levis...

Nonetheless, a GREAT day in my 4" boots...Don

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Great report! B)

I'd suggest you may be a little harsh on yourself with regard to the 5" heels.

I wore them regularly circa 25 years ago, when I had young flexible ankles and knees. More recently, I've struggled in a way I know I never used to, despite needing a size larger/longer. [Courtesy of being 3 stone heavier no doubt.] I'd say it takes A LOT of practice to wear a higher heel, and that might mean wearing that sort of heel every day, and for a couple of hours, every day.

Mrs Freddy [high heel expert] would say you get a better heel [more comfortable heel and footbed] with spending more money on a brand your foot likes. While I usually buy a less expensive shoe, most won't even go on her feet. Others have a rise that causes discomfort, others come without suitable padding in the footbed. Me, I can just about wear anything I can get my foot into. Of course a dense [thick and resistant] footbed with a seamless leather upper, offers the best in comfort, but may also be too expensive for a part-time heel wearer like myself. Love4heels has the perfect solution. Any style/any heel height, custom made to fit his feet at a very modest price.

I would think any crotchboot coming in under £200/$250 would be for bedroom/photographic use, rather than street wear. I hear Jimmy Choo's are the same. Look stunning, but not made for the rigours of walking on uneven or textured pavements. 1" [red] pile carpet, or marble floors only. ;):D

Shame about the photo's. I had looked forward to seeing them. Maybe next time? :huh:B)

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I do go into charity shops looking for footwear from time to time, but until recently, I'd not had much luck. But if you don't look, you'll never find anything - obviously.

Walked into a charity shop a couple of weeks ago, dragging Mrs Freddy with me. (She is such a snob. :rolleyes:) I was actually looking for some 'nearly new' work jeans in the ladies section. I really dislike the modern trend for bleached/weathered/worn/holed jeans, why would I ever want to buy jeans that looked used? I'm more than happy to use someone else's 'cast offs' for working duties, it's eco-friendly ("reuse is better than recycle") plus I convert stock into money for the charity. But they do have to look fairly unused - and be my size too of course. ;)

Anyway, no luck with the jeans, so I looked around the ladies shoes. Unbelievably, I found some 'vintage' (10-15 years old) Faith leather thigh boots, with 4 inch heel in 'as new' (unworn) condition..... In a UK8! :o I didn't buy them immediately, returning some 10 or 15 minutes later, this time alone. Would have been less of a challenge at the tills if Mrs Freddy had returned too, but I braved it out. :D It was a busy day, with smelly people behind me in 'the queue' that looked more like a group .... With every man or women - including the lady behind the till, thinking they were probably for me. 

Unfortunately the heel is too low for me, and the toe box a bit long, but they are really comfy to wear. While they are loose on my legs, the leather is stiff enough so it doesn't want to sag. Bit of a result. B)

Not that I'll be keeping them .....  They just are not high enough ... :(

   

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10 hours ago, FastFreddy2 said:

...Unfortunately the heel is too low for me, and the toe box a bit long, but they are really comfy to wear. While they are loose on my legs, the leather is stiff enough so it doesn't want to sag. Bit of a result. B)

Not that I'll be keeping them .....  They just are not high enough ... :(

   

Not high enough in the heel, I assume - or is it the shaft?   And, by 'toe box a bit long' do you mean too pointed, or size of boot is a 'large 8'?   A pic (preferably with you inside 'em) would be interesting so we may judge for ourselves.

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1 hour ago, Puffer said:

Not high enough in the heel, I assume - or is it the shaft?   And, by 'toe box a bit long' do you mean too pointed, or size of boot is a 'large 8'?   A pic (preferably with you inside 'em) would be interesting so we may judge for ourselves.

Not high enough in the heel. They would easily be an all-day-shoe for anyone. (Or should be.) 

"Too pointed", as in a bit long. Very comfortable for a slender foot, like mine. 

Modelled by the lovely Mrs Freddy, during her Renaissance "Cooperative" period, circa Jan 2016.

 

 56a2bcd6e2e4e_Faithboots.thumb.jpg.05a15

 

Not unlike the Rosa/1969 toe-box styles, but sadly without the 5" heel to go with it. Had they a higher heel, they would have been keepers. They are a 'snug' UK8 and likely unsuitable for anyone with wide feet. When I first tried them on, I was sitting on the edge of bed. When I tried to stand, I couldn't because the boots wouldn't allow my knee to function. :D Felt  delightfully weird. Leather upper, and leather lined. A similar boot from Dune or KG would be WELL in excess of £200 these days.

 

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"Cooperative" period ?    I shall therefore expect Mrs F to wear them when she next shops at the Co-op - or goes to any other 'Society' function.

Nice boots.   But, as you say, the heel should be higher (and ideally set forward a little).   A shame they have to go.

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Mrs Freddy doesn't do the Co-op. :huh:

 

They are really nice boots, but they do need a higher heel to become aesthetically pleasing. In fact they are so nice, if they had a shorter toe-box and a flat (manly) heel, they'd be keepers. :mellow:

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10 hours ago, FastFreddy2 said:

Mrs Freddy doesn't do the Co-op. :huh: ...

You do surprise me!   All that divvy gone to waste ...

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11 minutes ago, Puffer said:

All that divvy gone to waste ...

Translation for the ignorant please? :huh:

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The various co-operative societies traditionally give a 'dividend' (varying with annual profits) in the form of a cashback, based on members' purchase value over the year.   It is still done (although I think currently in suspension because of the Co-op's recent 'trouble at mill') and, for regular shoppers, can be a tidy sum.   Much the same as a Tesco Clubcard or Nectar Card.   Wife and I rarely use local Co-op, but it is handy if passing and milk etc has run out.   And the new TV I bought online a few weeks ago was much cheaper at Co-op Electrical than competitors - even without 'divvy'.

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While shopping at Tesco a couple of weeks ago (a place I don't enjoy going to - preferring ASDA), I got talking about Green Shield stamps. In my youth, I had worked on a supermarket checkout from time to time, and was reminiscing with both the checkout operator and Mrs Freddy. I mentioned power cuts, and using the older style electro-mechanical tills with a handle when power was out. Both made comments of derision concerning my age. Mrs Freddy always makes the most of our small age difference. The portly checkout operator may well have been younger too, but her (overindulgent) lifestyle made a different inference.

I've always liked the concept of the Co-Op, it being a way to get group purchasing power for the smaller trader. They used to have quite a good policy on ethical investments too, I vaguely recall. As you rightly say, been in the sticky stuff a bit more recently. I hope they survive. B)  

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Yes, the Co-op concept was (and still is) a good one, but I don't think it operates in the way you suggest; it is not controlled by traders.   It originated in Lancashire (the 'Rochdale Pioneers', if memory serves) as a means of working-class individual 'consumers' to band together and bulk-buy staple household goods at a discount, with profits returned to them by means of the annual dividend.   That has remained the pattern, with expansion into funerals, holidays, banking, insurance etc over the years.   The local/regional co-ops get their main supplies through the wholesale society that they in turn own.   I know that there is a an 'ethical' slant to the business but whether it is (a) rigidly adhered to; (b) effective is a moot point, although no doubt it appeals to some customers. 

This is not the same as a retailers' co-operative, such as Londis, Euronics etc.   That is a bulk-buying wholesaler which supplies various local 'independent' retailers, who are its ultimate owners.

 

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