FastFreddy2

Selling Shoes And Boots

205 posts in this topic

Two days in, and still no response from the buyer. I've sent it anyway. :rolleyes:

 

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On 4/24/2017 at 10:37 AM, FastFreddy2 said:

"Related", but slightly off-topic ....

I have noticed that some (Evilbay) buyers struggle to read. I have twice sold strobe lighting with "Collection only" clearly mentioned in the listing, with buyers then asking about carriage costs.

More recently, I listed a Makita drill with the same thing mentioned, bought by a chap 45 miles away. When asked about collection arrangements, I got no response so I had to refund, losing the benefit of the discount offer on fees I would have enjoyed if the sale went through. A couple of days ago, similar thing. I sold a Makita battery, with no picture of it shown at the time. (Why would someone bid on something they couldn't see?) I've since sent pictures of the battery, with the query; "Do you want?" The battery is 'as described' but I don't want it returned under the "Significantly not as described" clause .... I'd have to carry the cost of each way carriage in that situation (As unlikely as it might be.) I've not heard back from the bidder, and it's been some 25 hours at the time of writing.

Sellers can be intellectually challenged too. I once bought a very cheap pair of New Look ankle boots with a decent heel. I had asked the seller if there was a platform on the shoe before bidding, and I was told "no". When they arrived, they had a 'hidden' platform. :rolleyes:  At the time, return costs would have made sending them back unattractive. Thankfully the rules have changed since and 'mis-sold' items are returned at the sellers cost, though actually getting that money can be a bit fraught (I've read). 

Not sure what to do about the battery. It's packed and ready to go .... The  simple thing to do would be to send it. It couldn't be argued the buyer was unaware of what was going to arrive... :huh:

Maybe I'm missing something here, but surely an item like this is often bought and sold on description alone, particularly if it is a catalogue item with a reference number etc.   Unless there was some difference or defect only apparent from a pre-sale photo, the purchaser can hardly argue that he didn't get what was advertised.

 

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1 hour ago, Puffer said:

Maybe I'm missing something here, but surely an item like this is often bought and sold on description alone, particularly if it is a catalogue item with a reference number etc.   Unless there was some difference or defect only apparent from a pre-sale photo, the purchaser can hardly argue that he didn't get what was advertised.

 

I would never buy anything "used" without seeing it, or an accurate photograph of it. I would expect anyone that did otherwise, to be courting disappointment.

It's fairly important for my own protection, that a buyer agrees they are happy with the condition of the item, before I send it. Otherwise I open myself up to the possibility of a complaint that it "wasn't as described". I only have to miss mentioning a scratch or a mark somewhere on the item, and it becomes 'not as described' and I open the door to a return request and potentially £12's worth of carriage with no sale to show for it. It's a pointless risk.

I sent the battery because I'd mentioned in the listing 'pictures to follow' and sent the pictures to the buyer a day before posting. I also sent better quality photo's to his email account and had no response from either attempt at contact. If the buyer is up to no good, thinking they can swap their duff battery for my good one, they are mistaken. There is a unique identifier on the casing, and casings can't be swapped without messing with the Makita security seal. 

I'm sure everything will be okay, but the signs of this are missing at the moment. I'll know in a day or two, as will you all. B)

  

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7 hours ago, FastFreddy2 said:

I would never buy anything "used" without seeing it, or an accurate photograph of it. I would expect anyone that did otherwise, to be courting disappointment.

...  

I well recognise your advanced photographic skills, Freddy, but you must tell us all how a photo of a used battery will demonstrate to the buyer the condition of the 'internals', which is what really matters.   And are you really suggesting that you can and should show the buyer every possible scratch or mark on an item like this or risk facing a rejection?   I appreciate your caution and self-preservation but there are limits.   Keeping a clear record of what you send against possible challenges makes sense, however.

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Posted (edited)

16 hours ago, Puffer said:

I well recognise your advanced photographic skills, Freddy, but you must tell us all how a photo of a used battery will demonstrate to the buyer the condition of the 'internals', which is what really matters.   And are you really suggesting that you can and should show the buyer every possible scratch or mark on an item like this or risk facing a rejection?   I appreciate your caution and self-preservation but there are limits.   Keeping a clear record of what you send against possible challenges makes sense, however.

Yes, there are limits.

A battery with limited use, ought to show it's limited use by overall condition. A well used battery, like a well used car, will show itself as such. The converse is true also, in that a battery exhibiting a 'concours d'elegance' condition, is unlikely to have spent much time on a building site. Regardless to the skills of the photographer (thank you), buying completely blind would in my opinion be a gamble I wouldn't consider for an instant. (An instant is given to mean a fraction of a second.) You might prefer to do otherwise, and you are of course completely free to do that.

The advantage of buying a modern technology lithium battery, is that they are very clever. "Abuse" of them is difficult. Charging condition is shown, so early cell failure can be recognised. The brand has a good reputation, and while I don't like their cordless drills, their batteries are really good. They are so well thought of, batteries that may not have spent their life on a building site, fetch quite good money. 

 

P.S.

Having re-read your reply several times, I have been trying to pinpoint the message in your post that I found so bothersome. I think I have it in that your belief is; since every scratch and mark can't be identified in a photograph (though it can) you think a photograph holds no value as a selling point? And further, since no certificated test is offered prior to the sale, even a good quality photograph has no value when selling a battery anyway? While you will doubtless revel at the challenge, Evilbay are fairly insistent a photograph accompanies the item on sale, to the point (IIRC) they won't allow the listing without one. (I had -self-evidently- used a stock Makita advertising image of the battery type offered in the listing, with the narrative regarding 'actual photograph of item to follow' as previously mentioned.) The photograph rule is one us 25 million sellers adhere to, with good cause. Transaction failures are best avoided. No-one wants them, no-one likes them, and a point you will support; they are a waste of someone's money - as I have already pointed out. It's not just me who thinks a good quality photograph of the item is an important contribution toward a successful sale, the whole global business does. 

Edited by FastFreddy2

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