Jump to content

Recommended Posts

A lucky find there, before the damage was done. Now that's preventative maintenance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lucky find there,

I'm due some luck, I can tell you. ;)

The plumbing in this place is a scandal. I have several pictures to share, but I don't know I've calmed down enough to write constructively without wandering into a rant. If I had been the original owner, I would be trying to sue someone. :huh:

Now we are walking on naked floorboards in the upper part of the house, there is clear evidence of at least two previous "waterfalls". (Large water stains on boards and adjacent walls.) Most of the water pipes touch floorboards somewhere in their run. We have several hot-spots where heated pipes provide poor-mans-underfloor-heating. :rolleyes: Given the amount of stored water in the house, and that we could not turn off the mains water until we found someone daft enough (aka willing) to replace the internal stop-cock (long story), I'm amazed we haven't had a major flood already. The two minor ones were bad enough, and I very much realise they were both wake-up calls to the overall condition of the 22mm pipework here.

Obviously, I need to get a wriggle on. ;):D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, as reported elsewhere, getting a new kitten has me even slower at completing the refurb. It's like having a child around, and just like a child, I'm not happy to lock it in a room away from anything I might be doing. :huh:

During the past month I've gained some experience of using plasterboard, and managed to complete some 'dry-lining' as some will know it as. I've a long way to go before I use any board larger than 70cm x 170cm, though I will have to sooner rather than later. So far, I've used adhesive, and on the larger board, some mechanical fixings too. All seems solid, and no plastering skill required.

I'm getting 'a thing' for drills too. I reported about Makita SDS Plus rotary drill. I'm now the owner of 2 AEG compact drill/drivers, and 2 AEG combi hammer drills. Why? I get proper fed up with changing bits every 5 minutes. For example: Last week I did a private CCTV install at a commercial premises. Took the one hammer drill. Piloting, prior to drilling off full size had me changing bits like a mad thing. So much easier with 2 drills. And a third with a screw-driver bit in it! :D

Today I bought a 9" grinder, with some stone cutting blades. I have some masonry to cut, and some concrete to modify. Hammer drill, even rotary (SDS Plus) are useful, but a 9" grinder make for much neater removal. Had my eye on a 5kg 'breaker', but not sure if I should invest. :huh:

Catch me at the right moment though ...... :D

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I know, I haven't made mistakes with my DIY'ing, always opting for the 'belt and braces' solution. Well, not made a mistake until last week that is. :huh:

I'd spent some weeks changing the shape of walls where the new bath was going to get fitted (by me.) All was good, except being without a bath was getting very difficult, several days into a 30 degree heatwave. I fitting the bath prematurely, opting to tank it later, and fit it permanently when the weather cooled. [Our summer lasted 3 weeks last year.] So I fitted the bath, and to stop water getting splashed onto the newly replaced flooring, used decorators caulk rather than silicone around the outside of the bath. This stuff isn't waterproof, and usually 'peels' off quite easily. I chose a good brand, and paid extra for the better quality stuff. MISTAKE!

This week it was time to remove the bath and tank the walls, prior to tiling. The caulk appears to be better than silicone and better than most adhesives. I have spent the better part of a day digging the stuff out from around the bath, wrecking the repaired walls, and putting 2 scratches in the new bath. :( I've no skin left on any (finger) knuckle of my right hand.

I could cry. -_-

1. I should never have used the caulk I did, and in fact letting drips of water hit the flooring, would have caused less damage. I will use several days getting the walls back to their original condition, plus I'll spend another day cleaning the very-well-bonded caulk off the bath.

2. If I had known before I started how much damage removing the caulking was going to cause, I'd have left it in place, and done the 'tanking' over it. :rolleyes:

Older - wiser? (Let's hope.) :huh:

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could cry. -_-

Still crying.

The brush-on tanking membrane I bought, quotes "two coats" being required. So far I've applied 4, and there's still places I can see the wall through it. The original kit was around £78, and I had to spend another £62 on a second tub of goo to get coat no.4 on the walls. Each coat has had me throw a paint roller, and every second coat, a paintbrush. Most people wouldn't have bothered, and certainly there was no tanked walls behind the tiles I removed. OCD has a lot to answer for.

While prep'ing the bath for the re-install, I found two of the corners of the bath had cracked. I'd bought a fibreglass bath, as these are usually more resilient to minor abuse. The replacement bath at my previous dwelling was steel, as will be my next one. I'm currently trying to repair the cracks, and reinforce them so further damage is prevented. As long as the cracks don't progress, they'll be hidden. Given the time it's taking, I would have preferred to have bought a second bath. Except that it would have to be identical of course (since I've shaped my opening for this particular bath) and an identical bath might come with the same problem; weak corners. :rolleyes:

I suspect Mrs Freddy is thinking that if I hadn't have 'trial fitted' it so many times (about 10) I might not have this problem. I'm thinking, if I hadn't caulked it in, I might not have this problem...... :huh: Ho-hum.....

....

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still crying.

I'm currently trying to repair the cracks, and reinforce them so further damage is prevented. As long as the cracks don't progress, they'll be hidden. Given the time it's taking, I would have preferred to have bought a second bath. Except that it would have to be identical of course (since I've shaped my opening for this particular bath) and an identical bath might come with the same problem; weak corners. :rolleyes:

Having repaired/strengthened three of the four corners (waiting for the fourth to harden a bit while I'm writing this), these cracks were always going to happen. At least two corners were hollow, with a paper-thin covering making it look like they were made correctly. Taken me some considerable time (and patience) to make them solid.

"Buy cheap, buy twice?" :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear, sounds like you are having some issues there Freddy. At this end our bath panel has shifted and pulled away from the sealing strip so it all needs to be pulled out and reseated and held in place somehow before fitting a new strip. The bath also moves too much on one side as it fills with water so it keeps breaking the sealant at the end on that side so I've got to find a way to deal with that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear, sounds like you are having some issues there Freddy. At this end our bath panel has shifted and pulled away from the sealing strip so it all needs to be pulled out and reseated and held in place somehow before fitting a new strip. The bath also moves too much on one side as it fills with water so it keeps breaking the sealant at the end on that side so I've got to find a way to deal with that.

As I (now) fancy myself an expert in bath sealing ....... :rolleyes:;):D

You must have too much movement in the up/down or side/side plane .....

Up/Down, you know the sealant should be applied (and allowed to go off completely) with the bath half-full of water? I understand why, but my bath is currently supported on 3 sides, (will be all 4 when fully installed) and in 3 places along the bottom too. [And these in turn sit on top of an RSJ. Movement - how?] It's some of the reason the caulking was so successful .... No stress movement....

Side/Side, must be uneven support? No chance to tether the bath to a wall?

I had originally planned/bought to use, some Unibond "Weather-Guard Outdoor" Extreme Repair Sealant, that not only comes with a 35 year warranty, but very good reviews. Good quality products don't come cheap (£9-29 Homebase) but it's flexibility takes some beating, at +/- 50%.

Since I don't need that amount of flexibility, and I have another use use for the tube anyway, I'll be using Dow Corning '785' Bacteria Resistant Silicone. Again, not the cheapest product on the market @ £6 a tube, but also comes with very good reviews. B) Movement at +/- 20% which is hopefully, +/- 20% more than I need. :D

My bath has a 40mm vertical rim. I managed to get between 5mm and 20mm of slightly flexible (Unibond) caulk down 3 sides. The bath did not move - at all. In some places I had to use a fine saw blade to disconnect the bath from the wall..... :huh:

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, filled the bath half up with water. The bath can only be secured to the wall at the back and one side, the rest is supported on the supplied legs and some spreaders to spread the load on the floor. I am considering blocks beneath the bath at the unsupported areas to stop the movement before the next attempt at re-sealing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, filled the bath half up with water.

Does this show where the movement is? ie. up/down or side/side?

The bath can only be secured to the wall at the back and one side, the rest is supported on the supplied legs and some spreaders to spread the load on the floor. I am considering blocks beneath the bath at the unsupported areas to stop the movement before the next attempt at re-sealing it.

Before putting in the new bath, I re-mapped the floor supports; typically joists. I knew there were two RSJ's supporting the whole upper floor, but hadn't realised the centreline of the bath, ran directly over one of the RSJ's.

I have two spreaders that came with the bath. I placed these at far ends of the bath directly over joists that butt into the RSJ. Over time, the joists have sunk slightly, so the floors fall away (downward) from the floor board sitting on the RSJ. To counter this, the original builders installed some timber supports that follow the joists. I took off a central support from the original bath, and re-used that in the middle of the new bath. The underneath of the new bath has chipboard bonded into the fibre glass to support the weight inside the bath evenly. [As is common. This isn't required on a steel bath.]

So, I have a longitudinal RSJ, with floorboards laterally over. Above that, 3 blocks also laterally, following the butted joists. I have 3 supports, circa 20 inches/60cm apart longitudinally, providing stable lift to the underneath of the bath. The upper (40mm) edge of the bath, is prevented from sinking by a ledge, around three of the four sides. (With 4th side being supported similarly after final installation). The three sides will be 'bonded' in as before, but this time with bacteria resistant silicone, rather than very sticky and very solid decorators caulk.

I think in your place, I'd be looking for any movement from the bath support system.

Because I completely removed my original bath, I was able to install a ledge the bath initially sits on, to give me the correct height and position. I then adjust the 5 support legs, so the underneath of the bath carries weight. The idea is the bottom and sides carry load on 60/40 or 70/30 ratio. I'll never know if this is what I'm getting, but the first try with the caulk produced 'null' movement anywhere that could be detected. If I had used ANY type of silicon with my first sealing attempt (that was supposed to be a temporary measure) I doubt I would have removed the bath again because it was so stable.

I'm wondering if one of your support legs isn't carrying its share of the weight load, or is sitting on a floor that doesn't have a directly supporting joist underneath. Meaning, it can flex? The way to check, would be to use a laser level, and first mark positions of the legs with bath empty. Fill bath, and check position of the marks against the laser line. (I shouldn't suggest this, but you could buy an inexpensive laser level if you don't own one, and return it after 'trying-it-out'? Think this has been done before. ;) )

Or just install a £5 piece of chipboard across the whole (original) floor, effectively spreading any load whatever the circumstances. I can't see 19mm chipboard on top of 19mm boards allowing deflection? I'd double check your bath support legs haven't unwound themselves too. I will be checking mine again in 2 months, to qualify if there's been any settlement in the system.

As far as lateral movement is concerned, the decorators caulk I used (and advised previously - 5mm to 20mm depth on 3 sides), I doubt I would have needed this stuff anywhere other than along the long (170cm) side to keep the bath in place. It was tough enough to pull the wall down! :D

Seriously, there is a VAST difference in product ranges. I have used some 'superior' branded products that were completely useless, and some less expensive ones I found could do anything. Unibond seem to be very good overall, and the gear I mentioned earlier (Dow Corning) came with very good reviews. With something producing the problem you have, I would respectfully consider ramping up the silicone budget if you haven't already. I would imagine a 10-15mm deep vertical bead around 2 edges of a bath [ie between bath lip and wall] should hold it firm. I don't mean a sealing bead along the top of the bath and the wall, I mean between the bath lip and the two walls.

I'll do some photo's of my setup later. Hopefully the repairs will be concluded today. I'd very much like to be using the bath I bought, nearly 3 years ago now. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bath is now permanently back. It's glued to the wall, and supported in over 3 of the 4 sides. [some of the 4th side enjoys being hidden by a return wall.]

When I 'bonded' it in using silicon, I kept water in the bottom of the bath for 3 days while the stuff went off. During that time, I put additional packing underneath, where the 40mm lip wasn't quite 40mm and left a gap between the support rail I'd fitted to the wall. In some places there was a 3mm gap, which there no longer is. I hope I never have to remove the bath again, as I'm fairly confident it won't be coming out in one piece. :o

The very poorly positioned mains cable running over one of the two RSJ's holding up the upper floor.post-40-0-09855100-1377819371_thumb.jpg

I've added some plastic trunking to further isolate the cable from grounding on the RSJ in the event of a water leak. Originally the access hole was 12" [30cm] square. :rolleyes:

As you can see, the mains cable sits underneath a water trap.post-40-0-07687700-1377819370_thumb.jpg

The potential for water leaks is enormous. I've stapled some thick plastic over the cable to act as an umbrella.

Two of the four corner repairs. Note side No.4 post-40-0-46377900-1377819367_thumb.jpgpost-40-0-32779700-1377819368_thumb.jpg

These two broke when I removed the bath for the final time. As the corners were hollow, my only surprise was they didn't fail earlier. I didn't get the reinforcing brackets in every corner, as two of them were round not square. I did reinforce all four corners though. The wall with no support for the bath lip, is the return wall on side 4.

In for good. post-40-0-22717000-1377819369_thumb.jpg

The fully tanked walls are visible above the bath.

The bath support legs [5] are also visible as is the bath rim support on the left hand side.

.....

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The water gremlins visited again, week ending Friday 30th August .....

As at Wednesday or Thursday 29th, I got an unpleasant smell in the storeroom that will one day be our 'living room' or front room. Given I have all my sealants there, and other noxious chemicals, I thought I would wait to see if it disappeared before calling in the M.o.D. and the Chemical Warfare unit. ;):P:D

Sunday p.m. finally had me both; recognising the (too familiar) smell of wet plasterboard, and looking upward to find the cause of the smell. Water, obviously from a leak. Interestingly (from the house plumbing technical point) a leak from somewhere I thought was devoid of pipework...... :huh:

A scan into the next small box room, had me looking at almost running water, seeping into air-brick as it dripped down the wall. :o

post-40-0-90172400-1378768870_thumb.jpg

Instantly galvanised into action, I started cutting up floorboards, of the ONLY room in the house we'd thought could be left alone. :( First obstacle, the neat/clean/tidy laminated flooring, now only suitable for firewood. Next the floorboards..... And the best tool for the job, my Worx Sonicrafter multi tool. These tools cut floorboards with the minimum of fuss, and minimum of damage.

I still had to get the nails out of the boards to lift them though. (I'm no cowboy :P). I have a technique that involves removing wood from around the top of the nail, and then using mole-grips to 'wiggle' the nail out. Leaves me a countersunk hole where I use a wood screw to hold the board down later. Some skirting board had to come off the wall too.

Probably an hour after starting, and some 3 or 4 days after first smelling a leak, I finally found it. :wacko: Another pin hole, so small it looked like a spiders thread, but releasing water 24/7 for probably 4 days, had let a considerable amount of wet stuff wash over joists. ceilings and walls. :(

We used the same shaped plastic curve utilised twice before, filled with Fernox LS-X to effect a temporary repair. Of course the hole wasn't away from a wall or joist .... So the temporary repair might be permanent until the boiler is replaced and the pipe will become redundant anyway. See pictures.

post-40-0-07286700-1378768920_thumb.jpgpost-40-0-70854200-1378769108_thumb.jpg

Usually I have to use plastic tie-wraps to close the patch, but this time I managed to get some jubilee clips (clamps?) around the patch, though not the whole length of the repair. Of course the hole would be just about under the edge of a floor board, a partition wall sits on! :rolleyes:

Looking at the second picture in the post, you'll notice a red circle toward the bottom right-hand corner of the picture? This is where I wasn't very careful with the multi-tool, and scraped the moving blade across the top of the two copper pipes. :( Fortunately, the scrapes are in a good position to repair using solder and copper. I'll be sorting that out before the boards go back.

I'd like to replace the section of pipe wear the leak is, but that means removing the nearly installed toilet, and lifting the floor in the bathroom. And that just isn't going to happen! :P:D

.....

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow are you having some bad luck with the water works at the moment. Still at least it's sorted before too much damage is done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow are you having some bad luck with the water works at the moment. Still at least it's sorted before too much damage is done.

 

I had something of an epiphany today.

 

On an earlier post I mentioned I was going to re-use some of the redundant 22mm hot water supply pipe, but couldn't because it had a hidden hole in it. The hole had been kept plugged by a "black scab" that was probably oxide. 

 

I had thought -until today- the two pipes shown above were both hot water pipes, because they are both routed via the hot water tank cupboard. [Often referred to, as the airing cupboard.] Me thinking, one pipe went to the bath and sink, the other fed another room. [Kitchen, downstairs loo?]

 

The epiphany was that one of the two pipes was actually the bathroom cold fill. (And it is. B) ) So why should that be surprising? The main cold water storage tank sits immediately above the bathroom, at worst, 8ft from the bath tap (and closer to 6ft.) Yet the actual cold fill goes via the airing cupboard (where it replaces hot water used), then comes all the way back across the house piped with the hot water. A combined route of around 25ft.  :huh:

 

So instead of looking at two hot pipes, I now know one is the cold fill, one the hot. And not 4ft from the current (hot water pipe leak) and on the same run, was the hot water pipe with the hidden leak I had removed before it failed. It now looks like it may not have been residual flux (though it still might), but could be poor quality copper pipe? Unless the oxygen in hot water corrodes significantly faster than that in cold water? Either way, that length of pipe has to go. But how, since it runs under a wall, and a newly installed toilet?

 

Thanks to the epiphany, I'm sure I can use what I know to be the redundant cold fill pipework! (Yay!) I can terminate the cold fill in the bedroom where the recent leak was, and crossover the hot water to the (currently redundant) cold water pipe. I'll need to change the pipe connection for the hot water feed in the bathroom, but that's no bother. When it's done, I should have no further need to worry about the temporary fix letting go either.  

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have decided, homes are not usually designed with maintenance in mind. In fact, I would go so far as to say, absolutely no thought goes into designing in routes for repairs or servicing in a home at all.

 

 

At the end of last week, I had remove a couple of additional pieces of floor board along the pipe run, to begin repairs, as the wood and plasterboard seemed to have dried out. No visible joins to disconnect with a view to making a crossover, but at least I had enough visible pipe to pull it slightly out of the recess for using 'sweated' type pipe joins.

 

Imagine my disappointment then, when I found a third leak! Nothing like the original dam-burster, more of a water drip every 3 - 4 hours, maybe even longer between drips. Once found, Mrs Freddy reveals she's been smelling that water-on-wood smell for a couple of days, and had been so concerned she had checked the temporary repair to ensure it had held good. Now we have the culprit. Which means it would be prudent to replace an even longer section of the hot water pipe.

 

 

So the 'leaking pipe saga' got some energy thrown at it today, with me taking up more of the laminate flooring in the only room that didn't need immediate work, with the rest of the afternoon spent trying to locate the source of the mysterious cold fill pipe without removing just about every floor board in the same room.

 

For around 4 years I have resisted a yearning to own a bore-scope, not least because of its cost at circa £450. Now they are £550, it looks like my yearn is becoming a desperate need. Drilling a 4mm hole in a floor board, is a lot, lot, lot easier than removing 4 or 5 boards to gain access for a look-see. Today I also removed a 3ft x 6ft 'bodge' panel used by the original builders to hide pipework. In removing it, I had hoped it would reveal the enigmatic cold-fill source. No such luck. So I have to remove even more floor boards tomorrow after all.

 

A hollow countersinking tool that took wood out from around nails, would save me sooooo much time though.

 

Because the house is in renovation mode, I don't have to concern myself with lifting carpet, sourcing a good plumber, nor a good carpenter to make-good the damage a plumber might make. Fortunately for me, I'm becoming a bit of an old-hand at these tasks, and making good is becoming my speciality. (Meaning, not only does the finish look nice, it probably performs better, since I'm able to put the time in a tradesman couldn't. As, every board I put back down goes down with screws, so getting them back up again is much much easier! :D) Though taking up floorboards, could never be seen as a pleasant job .....

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

October passed with very little done on the Freddy rebuild. Unbelievably, I got asked to help someone else with some refurbishment work. Consequently, I spent most of October PAINTING walls and ceilings. Just for the record, the only bit of painting I like, is the last/finishing coat.

 

8 hours of painting, 5 days a week had me exhausted at the end of most days. Very physical work, which I haven't done for quite some time.  :D Have been asked if I want more painting work .... I said "yes", but I have no idea if more will be offered. Apparently, I do a good job, but need to get faster .....  :wacko:  No-one accounts for the repairs required to newly plastered walls, which there were many, or having to strip and repaint walls that were still wet when they painted the first time ..... ["That paint will stick to wet plaster." Well, it didn't, did it?  :rolleyes: ]

 

Homeowner was happy though.  B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the second job but .... Having done all the prep work, leaving only the easier simple finish coat painting to do, another two fellas came in and did that easy bit. Only left me with more 'grief' jobs, so I left.

 

Got a third job a couple of weeks ago though, which is keeping me busy. Resized a door, which wasn't part of my painting duties. Did a better job of cutting the door square, than the chippie did, but then I could take my time.[Clamped a guide to the bottom of the door, which given the curved line left by the chippie, he hadn't.] Also worked out why an extractor cover wouldn't close, which the electrician (and owner) couldn't, though it was obvious why? [One corner of the module was pulled away from 'square' because they had used countersunk screws instead of mush(room) heads.] Looks like the unit might be duff anyway, as unless the humidity control is switched off completely, the minimum setting of 40% keeps the fan going forever. This despite there being no water vapour in the room at all, just warm dry air.

 

 

The Freddy's house refurb is on hold again, much to the disappointment of Mrs Freddy. I finish on this 3rd job, second week in January, if not before. Quite looking forward to doing some in my own home, which is a feeling I haven't had for some time. I'm wondering if I should start painting as a business....

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At around 11.30pm tonight, I thought I could hear someone trying to break in downstairs .......

 

 

We have had gale force winds here in the UK today, accompanied by torrential rain. Horrible day, though the temperature is mild compared to what is expected for late December. The air pressure outside, is making the seals on the double glazing vibrate as air is pushed past them. The low sound they are making, is a bit spooky.

 

As Mrs Freddy readied for bed, she had a look outside into the dark wet night. The solution to the 'break-in' sounds were revealed. The two 6ft fence panels closest to the house had been blown over, torn away from the house by the gusting wind. I have pulled them close to the house, hopefully away from the wind. I've also parked a number of bricks around the edges of the panels, to help prevent them being lifted. With more of this weather due later in the week, it'll be a little while before I attempt a repair. Looks like the middle support post (of the two panels) has snapped.

 

I am worried about the roof tiles. Bad enough to lose some while windy, disastrous to lose them while suffering monsoon grade rain too.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had some wind damage to our fence as well here a few weeks ago. I just secured them for winter and will work on it this spring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just secured them for winter and will work on it this spring.

 

With a next door neighbour who isn't overly fond of cats, and ours with a taste for his plants (unbelievably :wacko:), I don't have the luxury of waiting.

 

I've had a quick look at the problem. The post held to the (house) wall, has been pulled off the wall (!!!!) taking the fixings and mortar with it. The centre post between the two downed panels has snapped cleanly at the base. To replace the broken post, I will have to drill out the concrete around the remains, to a depth of around 2ft. A nasty job in any location, but made worse as the hole is between two patio's (neighbours and mine). And on my side, the hole will be immediately adjacent to our shared (main) drain, with the access cover practically touching the broken post. It's going to be all too easy for me to do something that'll be very expensive to repair .... :rolleyes: 

 

 

As reluctant as I usually am to "buying-in" support, it might be a prudent move to sub-contract this job out to a builder with good insurance cover. ;) Will try to take some piccies over the weekend. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

;) Will try to take some piccies over the weekend. 

 

I have the picture 'in camera', taken the one dry we saw recently.

 

Weather here is awful. Wet (as usual) with 30mph winds gusting to 50+mph. I'm currently listening to Mother Nature trying to either blow down or blow apart, my home and anything else in its way. Tomorrow mid-morning will start to see the winds begin to drop, but it's not very pleasant outside, with blown debris (like trees) causing problems.

 

If I had already had the fence repaired, I'd probably be collecting it from a neighbours garden again, sometime tomorrow. :(  

 

While us Brits are used to experiencing varied weather, I think most of us are getting a little fed-up with the continuous rain and wind.....  

 

 

 

P.S.

 

Almost forgot to mention ...... We have had another plumbing 'disaster' ......

 

The toilet I installed last summer, created a little bit of panic 2 months ago, because the connector piper to the main waste started to slip off the pan. Some drips of water appeared during flushing (so clean water for the most part). Easily fixed by pushing the pipework back where it should be, after first drying/disinfecting the damp patch. I marked the connector to ensure further slippage could be noted and fixed before a further spill.

 

I then forgot about the mark....

 

Around 10 days ago, the connector slipped off again. This time the it had gone unnoticed for a day or two, so the underneath of the pan was wet. I decided (stupidly it turned out) to empty the loo completely, and move it so the floor could be cleaned and dried.

 

Firstly I turned off the water, and undid the two bolts holding the pan to the floor. The cistern is 'close-coupled' and didn't need to be removed. I flushed the toilet to empty the cistern prior to shuffling the assembly...... Without realising me undoing the floor fixing had allowed the pan and connector to almost separate! The bathroom floor flooded almost immediately. Fortunately Mrs Freddy was close by and supplied 3 bath-sized towels to contain the water.

 

 

The towels have been soaked in disinfectant, and given a 60 degree wash in a special anti-bacterial solution (not that they touched anything more than cold clean water really).

 

The floor cover (painted hardboard) was removed after some initial drying, and used as a template for the replacement. The floorboards, that probably didn't have any contact with water, were given some time for drying anyway.

 

The floorboards have been rubbed down, and painted with an oil based paint to protect against further water incursion, and contain any residual staining (found to have been caused by the previous owners some time ago.) The gaps between the boards have been filled with silicon, and all this topped with a plastic film. It's very unlikely water will get through the boards if there is a 3rd leak.

 

The replacement hardboard cover is in place, and the finish paint coat went on this afternoon.

 

The problem seems to be the toilet pan outlet that doesn't want to hold onto the connector. The porcelain tube is very smooth, and points slightly downward. I am thinking I should glue/stick/bond a plastic ring on the outlet, so there is a mechanical stop to the connector falling off? Silicone might be and answer too, perhaps I should on You Tube for advice. I'm also wondering if there might be an alignment issue. I don't have access to a 3D laser scanner, so have no way to replicate the alignment of the connector - when connected. There's next to no room for measuring, or to a degree, even seeing the connector when connected. I purposely bought a pan with a skirt, so the (usually) unsightly connector was hidden from view!

 

Thankfully we have two toilets in our house, or I would have been in BIG trouble over this.....  :huh:

Edited by FastFreddy2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is probably one for Freddy but all comments welcome, I have ordered a 3700 mm wide x 3000 mm deep x 2450mm high lean to self build conservatory!!

i was wondering how deep to go with the base foundations, andis it a major problem going over the sewer pipe, though there is no manhole on my property.

i was thinking a 300 mm trench with 150 mm for the floor slab, any ideas??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As much as I'd like to provide some guidance on foundation depth, I haven't needed to dig-too-deeply ;)  :D  into finding out the requirements for this kind of job. However, where I plan to do something similar, I will be using the requirements of a vehicle 'drive' to ensure I don't get subsequent movement.

 

I'm fairly sure a patio (on which you might sit a lightweight-stand-alone conservatory), isn't usually built with 300mm deep bases, and 150mm (thick?) brick or concrete cover? That must be getting on for, but-not-quite, car hard standing depths. B)  If you haven't already, I'd certainly recommend checking Building Regs for square-foot coverage ratio, and (your) border limits for conservatory dimensions.     

 

If you wanted to add some before and after photo's, I'm sure many would be interested to see them.  ;)   B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Tuesday of this week, Mrs Freddy complained the heating didn't come on in the morning.

 

Little did I know what this would lead to, nor the time/effort involved in solving the problem. :rolleyes:   :( 

 

I'll save you all about 15 minutes reading time and me about 2 hours typing ...... It was the room thermostat wireless receiver (boiler switch) that developed a thermal problem in one of it's circuits.

 

Since a receiver goes for about £50, I'm using it as an opportunity to upgrade to a 7 day, 7 settings a day wireless thermostat at circa £107 delivered.   B)

 

Intermittent and irregular faults are always hard to find. Took me 5 days, with around 5 hours of messing around on three of those days. Conclusion reached when the receiver was stored in the freezer for 20 minutes this morning, and the CH system worked for 20 minutes afterward. Longest it's been on in a single stint since Wednesday. :rolleyes: Managed to borrow a receiver for a couple of days (hehehe) until the replacement arrives later in the week. I can't tell how much pleasure I got today, just being in a warm house.   :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×